The Smoke Signal

Evening Out the Score

Lady Indians Find Success in a Male Dominated Sport

Claire DeKruyf, Journalist

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Wrestler Alayna Swilley gets ready for her match.

Even though there are male and female wrestlers, wrestling is considered to be a male-dominated sport. Some female high school wrestlers at Ripon High want this to change but many actually believe that wrestling has changed and become a more equal sport.

“I don’t really notice that I’m surrounded by guys,” said freshman Emily Ahuna “We’re all friendly with each other and we’re all a team.” She said that she feels like wrestling used to be a male-dominated sport but not as much nowadays.

Ahuna isn’t the only one who feels that gender bias in wrestling isn’t the same as what it was. “I don’t think wrestling is a male-dominated sport,” said sophomore Melissa Perez

Although the male majority in wrestling is changing, there are still things that make women feel excluded.  “Some things that make me feel excluded,” said Perez “Whenever we have a dual meet and the other team doesn’t have girls, people ask me ‘Do you even wrestle?’ and it bothers me so much.”

Other girls feel excluded for other reasons, such as being an underclassman or not knowing many people on the team. 

“The only thing that makes me feel excluded was being a freshman, just because most of the team had been around each other they knew each other before they knew me,” said Ahuna.

Ripon High only has male coaches and some students argue that having at least one girl coach would be helpful. “Sometimes it is awkward when I’m having personal problems and I can’t really talk to my coaches about it,” Ahuna said.

Although having a female coach might be easier, the team is happy with the coaches they have now. 

One of the major debates of wrestling is whether females should be able to wrestle males. Many women argue that they can handle wrestling the guys. Also, girls often don’t get to wrestle because there aren’t enough girls on the other team to wrestle them.

“I do believe girls can wrestle boys in the same weight class,” Perez said. She said that there are some cases where they can’t wrestle each other, but a lot of the time it would work.

Despite not having as many opportunities to wrestle during league matches, the girls’ were successful in divisions on Saturday, February 3rd. Alayna Swilley won her 2nd straight Sac-Joaquin South Regional Wrestling title. Alayna and 4 of her teammates will move on to the Sac-Joaquin Girls’ Masters in two weeks with a chance to qualify for state.

Also moving on for RHS are Alyssa Oliver who placed 5th, Marissa Hernandez and Faith Borges who placed 7th, and Melissa Perez who placed 8th. The team placed 6th overall.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    RHS Cheerleaders Jump to the Top

  • Evening Out the Score

    Community

    The Truth About Going on a Diet

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    Students Keep Clean Act, Avoid Tide Pod Challenge

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    RHS Cheerleaders Recognized at Board Meeting

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    Brotherhood on the Basketball Court

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    November A.C.E. Video

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    Izzy and Isaiah’s Big McWin

  • Evening Out the Score

    Community

    Coding Is The Future, You Just Don’t Know It Yet

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    Teachers Change Lives

  • Evening Out the Score

    News

    Hoops, They Did it Again

The Student News Site of Ripon High School
Evening Out the Score