Fall RHS Cookbook

Dillan Saltsman, Journalist

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Print Out This Cookbook at https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1QAyKTHKfzadY-8OlKGivTYxqsnIEcHvNiOFBDbIfyEA/edit?usp=sharing

A holiday that is celebrated with an abundance of food, Thanksgiving is the time of being grateful for what you have. Many will have family over, and are scrambling for recipes to cook for an amazing feast. For all of the people who attend RHS, what would be more fun and handy than a Student Cookbook? That is why the students of Ripon High compiled all of their favorite traditional treats, from chicken dishes to amazing pies

Food means something different to everyone. In many families, it is an honor for the parents and grandparents to pass down their favorite recipes for their kids to make in the future. These dishes remind many of who they love most. Mrs. Ochoa, an English teacher at Ripon High, shares what her recipe means to her during the holiday season.

“My fall dish is the Chicken Chile Verde Pozole. This dish is important to me because I grew up with my mom making it when the weather got cooler so it reminds me a lot of my mom,” English Teacher Ochoa said.

Food is largely the center of traditions because it seems to unite other people in a way that many other things cannot. This dates all the way back to the ancient Greeks, when food was a sign of good hospitality and celebration.

 “Every dish my family makes is important to me because traditions are a special part of our culture,and there’s always post-thanksgiving dinner nap as well as spending time with my loved ones to look forward to,”Junior Lundrigan said.

Many in the younger generation do not know how to cook an entire meal yet, and some are on the lookout for new recipes. Whatever the reason, the RHS fall cookbook provides a variety of recipes from many different people to enhance the culinary skills of our students and faculty.

I think [the school cookbook] would be cool, because then we could learn how to fix things.”

— Sophomore Rhylee Magazinovic