Student Work Permit

Student+Work+Permit

Jenny Pfeifer, Journalist

Do you have a work permit?

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As long as there are employees willing to hire high school students, there will be high school students who take those jobs…”

— Walden University

     Thinking of getting a job can sometimes be overwhelming, especially if you’re in high school. There is homework, sports, band/music, and many other extracurricular activities that students need to think about when considering to apply for a job. It’s good to ask yourself questions such as: “Do I want or do I need this job?” along with “Do I have time for a job?” Once you’ve answered these questions, you can consider getting a work permit.

     “As long as there are employees willing to hire high school students, there will be high school students who take those jobs. This means schools have to work with employed students to make sure their after-school jobs don’t lead to serious problems,” said Walden University. 

     Before a student can even apply for a job, they will need a work permit. A work permit is a permit that allows minors to be employed (only minors aged twelve to seventeen are required to get work permits before starting a job).  

     “Work permits indicate the duties and location where the work will be done as well as the number of hours a minor may work,” stated the California Department of Education. 

     The first step to getting your work permit is actually picking it up. Work permits are usually provided by the school. At Ripon High, students can pick up their work permit from the office . 

     “In most cases it is a two-step process, the minor along with the parent/guardian and employer fill out the B1-1 form and submit it to the school local to the minor’s address. The school district reviews the B1-1 form and issues the B1-4 (work permit),” said the California Department of Education. 

     After you have completed filling out the B1-1 form and the school issues the B1-4, it is necessary to read over the child labor laws so you understand all/any requirements and restrictions. 

     “The Labor Commissioner’s child labor law booklet contains comprehensive information about child labor laws, school attendance, wage, hour, and age requirements, restrictions, employer requirements and work permits,” stated the State of California Department of Industrial Relations. 

     Once you have finished reading over the child labor laws, you are ready to apply for your first job!